My Public Lands: 2018

After the Public Lands Day rally at the state capitol rotunda last year, it seemed like a good idea to keep track of my public land usage until the next rally rolled around. I normally visit a lot of state and federal public lands throughout the year, but never kept a record, and so never really knew the extent of my own personal use. My mission to document my outings proved not only enlightening, but also spurred me on to go new places and try new things. 

The following is a visual representation of my visits- as well as my varied activities- on Minnesota’s public lands since last April. You may notice that not every single day or visit is represented by a photograph. For instance, some photographs represent an activity carried out on several different parcels, at noted. Likewise, some outings occurred on many different days, such as foraging in Chippewa National Forest and George Washington State Forest throughout the summer and fall. I only wish I had remembered to bring my rally sign with me every time; regrettably, there are some gaps in coverage. 

Our public lands, as you can see, are important to me throughout the year for camping, fishing, hunting, foraging, educating my children, and much more. If you are so inclined, please consider joining the Public Lands Day rally at the Minnesota state capitol February 7th, at 3:00. Thanks, and get outside. 

C.C. Andrews State Forest, Kettle River

Sucker fishing and camping, Cloquet Valley S.F. and CC Andrews S.F., April 2018 Continue reading “My Public Lands: 2018”

Sullivan Lake Campground

Unlike the other two campgrounds in Finland State Forest, Eckbeck and Finland, Sullivan Lake Campground does not fill up as quickly on the weekends, and may be a good alternative for those who want to camp “up north.” This is especially true if they wish to stay away from the hordes at state parks and all over the North Shore. When I stayed there in July of 2018, it was sparsely populated and quiet. The camping fee is the rate for state forest campgrounds; in 2018 it was $14. 

Sullivan Lake is in a great location for those seeking outdoor recreation in Finland State Forest and southern Superior National Forest. Thousands of acres of county, state, and national lands are right on the doorstep of this campground for the use of fishermen, grouse hunters, deer hunters, foragers, hikers, and others. The historic settlement of Toimi is nearby, as is a Forest Service interpretive facility, for those interested in the logging history and early settlement of the area. 

Amenities

Most of these campsites have good shade provided by ample trees, if that’s your pleasure. Campsites 3-6 appear to have access to the lake; I couldn’t verify due to some sites being occupied when I was there. 3-7 can probably expect a breeze off the lake when the wind is out of the west. There are two vault toilets, one of which appears to be rather new. Water is from a hand pump, which is quaint; kids usually enjoy filling up with it…the first time. 

The Campsites

Site 1/Site 2

Sites 1 and 2 are close to each other and similar in makeup. Both grassy and expansive, they are great sites to set tents in, and could easily accommodate more than one each. Both sites are back-in parking. 

Site 3

This campsite is easily one of the more desirable sites. It features a generous tent area well off the road and screened by trees. Furthermore, it has one of the better lakeside areas in the campground. Parking is pull-through near the road, but carrying gear down to the lake is a small price to pay for this gem of a site. 

Site 4

Site 4 is another very desirable campsite with its developed lakeshore area and secluded tent pad. In fact, its private lake access and (small) swimming area make it the envy of the other campsites. The tent pad is good-sized, but is a gravel surface. Parking is pull-through, and this site could be the one with most sun exposure. 

Site 5

Parking in site 5 is pull-though, and would be a good choice for a camp trailer. The tent area is gravel. 

Site 6

Site 6 is another pull-through site, and would be a good choice for a towed camping rig. 

Site 7

There are decent-looking spots to put tents, however, they are next to the camp road. Ample shade and back-in parking. 

Site 8

This campsite is well-shaded and, compared to most of the rest, fairly secluded. The tent pad is gravel and looks marginally comfortable. It is at the end of the loop; parking is back-in. 

Site 9

Site 9 is the handicap accessible site in the campground. It is one of the more spacious sites, with the most level ground. There is lots of room for tents; the back-in driveway is long and would accommodate a large camping vehicle/rig. 

Site 10

This is another grassy campsite. May be best suited for tents; backing into it with a pull-behind trailer would be difficult due to the angle of approach. 

Site 11

Another grassy, spacious campsite. Back-in parking.

 

 

 

Minnesota Public Land Camping

Public Land Camping Resources

Dispersed Camping in Minnesota

Minnesota Camping Online Resources 

State and National Forest Campground Reviews

Boulder Campground, St. Croix State Forest

Harriet Lake Rustic Campground, Superior National Forest

Silver Island Lake Campground, Superior National Forest

Snake River Campground, Chengwatana State Forest

Sullivan Lake Campground, Finland State Forest

Willow River Campground, C.C. Andrews State Forest

 

Bring a Kid: Backpacking

Read More Kids Hike Through Tettegouche

After a hot and sweaty couple of miles on the trail, it didn’t matter how cold the water might be or that there wasn’t really a beach. Once we’d found our campsite, taken off our packs, and changed, my kids and I took to the lake for our hard-earned reward. We spent about an hour playing in the water before going ashore for a break. I was made to promise we weren’t done swimming. After sitting in the shade and eating raspberries a while, my son said wistfully, “I wish we could stay here a week, just to swim and eat berries.” He was in paradise. We all were.  Continue reading “Bring a Kid: Backpacking”

What To Forage

Read More

Click on links to view full articles:

  • Foraging in Minnesota: Blueberries
    Most Minnesota foragers—whether berry seekers or not—are familiar with blueberries.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Wild Plums
    When it comes to foraging, nothing says “end of summer” like wild plums. During that late August/early September time with cool mornings and moderately warm afternoons, I know without looking that American and Canada plums are coming ripe.  Prunus, spp. Most people don’t know it, but Minnesota is home to two species of wild plums.  American plum (Prunus ...
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Chicken of the Woods
    Do they really taste like chicken? If you’re not too critical, yes.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Wild Grapes
    Wild grape jelly is, admittedly, better than the stuff from the store. I say “admittedly” because I’d heard such claims and didn’t believe them— until I made my own.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Sand Cherry
    In Minnesota, Sand cherry is an inhabitant of dry— if not barren—places. Literally, think sand. In my quest to find P. pumila this year, I was most successful in the drier places of east central, west central, and northwest Minnesota.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Stinging Nettles
    The growing season has begun, when many useful and tasty greens will appear. This includes one plant which is easily overlooked, if not considered a downright nuisance: the stinging nettle.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Snozzberries
    If you’re reading this, you probably don’t know what you’re missing. Everybody else is in the woods. The snozzberries are out.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Blackberries
    It’s blackberry season. While I sit here typing this out in mid-August, I have a hunch there are literally tons of them out there going unpicked.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Hedgehog Mushrooms
    I place hedgehog mushrooms in the top echelon of wild mushrooms, right up there with hen of the woods, chanterelles, and black trumpets. It’s worth a trip to the woods hoping to find even a couple, especially if you’ve never before had the pleasure.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Juneberries
    Never had juneberries? I’m not surprised.They’re easy to miss, but maybe you should give them a closer look. Despite having a mild, less-than-distinct flavor, juneberries (AKA serviceberries, saskatoons )are worth targeting.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Dwarf Raspberries
    Every year about this time there is a lull in the foraging season here in Minnesota. The early season has passed and the frenzy over morels, fiddleheads, and ramps is over. However, the Dwarf raspberry is here now to take center stage.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Wild Strawberries
    If you’re itching to get out and pick some wild berries this year, I have good news for you: the strawberries are in. Wild strawberries are a good way to get kids interested in foraging, or at least engage them in conversation about where food comes from.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Ostrich Ferns
    The Ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) is gaining in popularity in the foraging community. Learn how to identify and cook this springtime treat.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Ramps
    Spring kicks off the foraging season. Ramps are popular and a delicious addition to many meals this time of year. Allium tricoccum and Allium burdickii are similar but separate species. Minnesota is host to both, but A. tricoccum is by far more common.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Black Cherry
    I’m sure you’ve heard of “black cherry,” either as a flavoring or as a type of wood. For me, the name evokes a certain flavor of candy. But did you know it’s a harvestable fruit here in Minnesota? Yes, it is.
  • Do Something New: Tapping Maple Trees and Making Syrup
    This year I tried tapping maple trees and making maple syrup in Itasca County, in northern Minnesota. I had to learn how to make maple syrup, but it was worth the time and effort.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Chaga
    Foraging for chaga in Minnesota is getting popular. Know where to find it and how to prepare it as chaga tea. Inonotus obliquus has been known for hundreds of years as a medicinal fungus; do yourself a favor and give it a try.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Cranberries
    Minnesota is host to two different varieties of wild cranberry: Vaccinium macrocarpon and Vaccinium oxycoccos. They can be found in the many swamps and bogs in northern and eastern Minnesota, and much of that is on public lands.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Maitake
    Grifola frondosa is a sought-after mushroom. It doesn’t seem to get the hype that morels and others do, but Grifola frondosa is one of the best-tasting, most versatile, all-around great mushrooms.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Wild Hazelnuts
    Wild hazelnuts are like a smaller version of the cultivated varieties, and Minnesota is host to both the American and Beaked hazelnuts. Know where and when to look for them, as well as how to identify them in the field and what to do with them.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Chokecherries
    Chokecherries are widespread in Minnesota, as well as in northern and western United States. Their flavor, once extracted from the heavily-pitted fruits, is unique and delicious.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Thimbleberries
    The Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) is native to Minnesota, but is not necessarily abundant. Closely related to the raspberry, it tastes somewhat similar, but has its own unique flavor and charm.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: Chanterelles
    Along with morels, hen of the woods, and a few others, chanterelles are one of the most popular mushrooms for foragers in Minnesota. Their mild, sweet flavor is very desirable in the kitchen, however there are several look-alikes which need to be avoided.
  • Foraging in Minnesota: The Early Season, Part 1
    The Minnesota spring foraging season offers much more than just morel mushrooms. Fiddlehead ferns (ostrich ferns), ramps, pheasant back mushrooms, greens, and more are all widespread and available for the taking.

 

 

Why are these posts called ”Foraging in Minnesota”? Follow this link for insight.

~

Foraging in Minnesota: Thimbleberries

Read More Rubus parviflorus

August 2005, Isle Royale    My wife and I went ashore from the ferry as it stopped at Windigo. With half an hour until the ferry continued around the island, we went into the visitor center to get our book stamped and ask about what we might find on the trail. We learned about the wolves, moose, and thimbleberries. “Whatberries?” I wasn’t sure if I’d heard correctly. “Thimbleberries,” repeated the Park Service employee. She described the berry she was talking about, and sure enough, we found plenty over our 6 days of hiking the island.  Continue reading “Foraging in Minnesota: Thimbleberries”

Bring a Kid: Berry Picking in MN

  • Slide Image
  • Wood Lily
  • Bumper crop of hazelnuts
  • Slide Image
  • Slide Image
  • Slide Image
  • Slide Image
  • Slide Image

Are you looking for a way to get kids into the outdoors? Do you want to do something simple, accessible, universally appealing, and fun? Take them berry picking. 

I took my kids yesterday to some public land in east central Minnesota with the hope of finding some mushrooms and, if lucky, some raspberries or blueberries. Well, blueberries ended up being the main attraction, with some bonus raspberries and mushrooms as well. This is why we call it “foraging,” and not simply “harvesting.” You never know what you’re going to find.  Continue reading “Bring a Kid: Berry Picking in MN”